This weeks links

  • SumoMe

#eprdctn hour

India Amos (@Indiamos), Senior Content Producer, ePubs, at Amplify Education, led this week’s discussion on documenting workflow. Read the Storify edition here:

https://storify.com/LauraB7/eprdctn-documentation-habits


EPUB hyphenation

Following a spirited discussion on Twitter over how to hyphenate long names and words that don’t appear in dictionaries (so that they don’t run off the screen), a couple of solutions were proposed.

The first, from Colleen Cunningham Wnek (@bookdesigngirl), involves inserting soft hyphens (­) where breaks are allowed:

https://thebookstudio.wordpress.com/2013/06/11/the-longest-e-problem-in-the-world-solved/

It’s been tested thoroughly, although not for a couple of years.

Then, this post was circulated:

https://justmarkup.com/log/2015/07/31/dealing-with-long-words-in-css/?mc_cid=ce70bb0280&mc_eid=386ca6a5cd

It’s been tested thoroughly in browsers; what remains is for someone to dig into EPUB/MOBI use and see how it flies.


Cover images: image size and CSS sizing

Joshua Tallent is back with a post for DBW on cover images in EPUBs. He includes markup, CSS, and best practices for EPUB2 and EPUB3. It’s a valuable read:

http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2015/best-practices-for-ebook-front-matter-cover-image/?et_mid=785647&rid=240592104


New Kindle format: KFX?

Aaron Shepard posted about a new rendering system from Amazon: KFX. He’s been examining the new formatting features, and has discovered at least one unpleasant item: the introduction of a line space between indented paragraphs. If this holds true for all Amazon books, it’s a terrible development.

This feature set is applied by Amazon after a book is uploaded, so developers have no way to manage the situation. Here’s the post, dated September 21:

http://www.newselfpublishing.com/blog/

 

 

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